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Your Anti-Shark Attack Handbook

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View/download our Anti-Shark Attack Handbook in poster form (PDF).
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Written by Roar with Katie Mosher (@ncsg_katiem) and NC Sea Grant (@SeaGrantNC). In addition to giving people the skinny on sharks, NC Sea Grant gives research, education, and outreach opportunities relating to issues affecting the North Carolina coast and communities. Whether or not you’re from NC, NC Sea Grant’s site gives you a chance to learn cool stuff. Check it out here.
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Illustrated by Heather Copley. Heather is a Clinical Social Worker whose hobbies happen to include: science, long walks on the beach, drawing technicolor dream sharks, and writing hilarious llama jokes.

By |June 24th, 2015|Backbones, Other Science|1 Comment

Collective Intelligence

Within ant colonies, nobody’s in charge. There’s no central control. No one, not even the queen, gives orders in the colony. The queen can:

But she doesn’t give orders for the other ants to follow. Instead, each ant walks around in her own world and operates on feedback from her environment.

These individual actions result in a collective intelligence, where the seemingly uninformed interactions of individuals can add up to a group dynamic that shapes the world.

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Ants aren’t alone with their collective intelligence. Individual decisions are how:

Our choices in the buffet line, our electing of leaders and even our internet search results all represent the presence of collective intelligence at work.

It’s easy to squash an ant. Pretty easy to catch a fish or knock down a bird. But to wipe out the insect society? Capture the school or flock? Smash our culture? Each individual choice, that ant reacting to the smell of a chocolate chip cookie, makes a world of difference.

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By Roar. Illustrated by Christin Hardy.

 Christin Hardy grew up in a teeny, tiny place called Seven Springs, North Carolina, where livestock outnumber people. Her father is a farmer and her mother is an artist, so naturally Christin turned out to be an artist who loves nature, infusing it into her work and life. Currently she works for the NCDOT designing posters, banners and brochures, but her heart lies in explaining science through illustrations and graphic design. […]

By |June 17th, 2015|Backbones, Bugs|1 Comment

Spider book update: Help us pick our species!

We’re writing a spider book!

Chris Buddle and Roar will soon present a happy volume packed with eight-legged greatness.

Each chapter will highlight a common species: a plain language and scientific overview of the biology and natural history of common spider species of North America. That’s a big task, because of the hundreds of potential candidate species, we’ll only highlight a dozen or so of the most common.

We need your help: Many of you provided valuable feedback on your favorite spidey friends, and we have already spoken to loads of Arachnologists, but we want to know what’s on everybody’s minds (spiderly speaking). See our chapter candidates and let us know if we missed a North American species SO INCREDIBLE IT MUST BE INCLUDED!

Here are the species we are proposing as “main chapters”:

Argiope aurantia (garden spider, or writing spider)

Oxyopes salticus (the striped lynx spider)


Neoscona sp. (orb-weavers)

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Misumena vatia (goldenrod crab spider)spiders_page1_1
Dolomedes sp. (fishing or dock spiders)
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Salticus scenicus (zebra jumper)
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Parasteatoda tepidariorum (American house spider)
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Latrodectus sp. (widow spiders)
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Pardosa sp. (thin-legged wolf spiders)
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Cheiracanthum sp. (ceiling spiders)

Agelenopsis sp. (funnel-web spiders)
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By |June 4th, 2015|Backbones, News, Spiders|15 Comments