­

Middle school isn’t so different for animals.

It turns out humans aren’t the only ones with uncomfortable tweens. Animals suffer through their own in-betweener stage. Today on Buzz Hoot Roar, a very talented middle schooler illustrates the ins and outs of animals’ most awkward age.

1. They’re weird looking. Gangly and awkward, pubescent animals have their own pimple-faced, braces-type, please-bury-my-yearbook-photo style. Just take king penguins, moose, cicadas, lions and cardinals, for example.

cade_stevepenguino1

 

2. They start getting fashion advice from their friends. When chimpanzees hit adolescence, they quit getting their mamas to do their hair in favor of a good grooming from friends. This helps form lasting bonds and keeps them from being the kid in class whose mama made his clothes.

cade_mompanzee2

3. Their voices change. Many animals get deeper voices as they get bigger. Red deer (Cervus elaphus) stags start trying to woo with their developing deep tones, but those voice-cracking preteens usually don’t stand a chance.

cade_deer3

4. They start hanging out with their buddies all the time. Instead of hanging at the watering hole with mama, elephants start to hit the mall, or at least pal around with their peers. Together they learn all sorts of things their mamas wouldn’t teach them. It’s the equivalent of a group of boys hiding a Playboy magazine under Billy’s mattress.

cade_elephant4

5. They start acting stupid. Youngsters tend to be heedless risk takers. Adolescent mice, for example, often show “unbalanced and extremes-oriented behavior, increased risk taking, […]

By |October 21st, 2015|Backbones|1 Comment

A Win for the Cat

Ah, the classic example of predator versus prey — the cat and mouse. Not only are their stressful encounters played out in cartoons like Tom and Jerry, they’ve also inspired scientists who use cat exposures to stress rodents in the lab.

Finally, it seems as if a single-celled parasite called Toxoplasma gondii can give cats the upper hand in this cat-and-mouse game.

 

Mice get infected by ingesting anything contaminated with oocysts (eggs from T. gondii), which can then penetrate the rodent’s nervous system and create cysts within its neurons. These cysts can remain in the mouse for its whole life!

As you can imagine, this does not end well for the mouse, who will likely get devoured by a new cat.

Interestingly, even after T. gondii is cleared from mice, they continue to have no aversion to cats, suggesting a permanent change in their innate behavioural response to cats.

_____

Written and illustrated by Catherine Lau. Catherine is a graduate student studying science communication at Laurentian University (Canada) with a research background in behavioural neuroscience (MSc). She considers herself an artist/scientist who is trying to merge both art and science together in hopes of better communicating science. Follow her on Twitter: @cat_lauscats

 

By |October 7th, 2015|Backbones, No Backbones|1 Comment