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About Buzz

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So far Buzz has created 5 blog entries.

Bringing Home the Honey

Honey bees have been making honey for millions of years, providing some of the earliest relief for humanity’s sweet tooth. But how is honey made?

While honey bees may be the most famous honey makers, some wasps and other bees make honey, too. Even some ants take to storing nectar–“honeypots” store nectar inside their distended abdomens. These ladies have so much junk in their trunks, they can barely even walk!

Written by Meghan Barrett and illustrated by Buzz. Barrett is currently a Biology PhD student at Drexel University, studying an expanded version of “bug brains.” When not fawning over native bees as part of her Bee Bytes initiative (byte-sized introductions to the bees of the US), she spends her time writing ecological poetry and science plays (or dabbling in #scicomm). More about her work can be found at meghan-barrett.com; you can find her on Twitter (@Bee_Bytes).

 

Check our facts!

Anderson C, Ratnieks F (1999). Worker allocation in insect societies: coordination of nectar foragers and nectar receivers in honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 46, 73-81.

Ribbands CR (1953). The behavior and social life of honeybees. Bee Research Association, London.

 

By |May 1st, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Hunka hunka burnin’ bees

Bees aren’t ALWAYS trying to chill out–they’re busy! Here are a few reasons our honeybee sisters might need to get warm quick.

Protect the hive!

Beat the freeze!

To stay warm in the winter, worker bees pack in tightly around the queen and shiver their flight muscles.

As bees near the inside of the huddle get too hot, they move outward, allowing the layers of colder bees that served as insulation at the cluster’s edge to get warm.

Stay healthy!

Sometimes “chalkbrood” spores infect a hive’s bee larvae, turning them into white lumps that look like … well, chalk. If bee larvae are infected with chalkbrood, the whole colony will give itself a fever. To stay well, workers heat up the brood combs, preventing the spores from developing inside the larvaes’ guts.

Written by Meghan Barrett and illustrated by Keren Albala.

Barrett is currently a Biology PhD student at Drexel University, studying an expanded version of “bug brains.” When not fawning over native bees as part of her Bee Bytes initiative (byte-sized introductions to the bees of the US), she spends her time writing ecological poetry and science plays (or dabbling in #scicomm). More about her work can be found at meghan-barrett.com; you can find her on Twitter (@Bee_Bytes).

Albala is an animator, illustrator and VFX artist working in Los Angeles, CA. She has created animated content for museums, science programs and documentaries, as well as 3D previsualization for Disney, Marvel and Universal feature films. Currently she divides her time between animating, teaching, playing in a ukulele orchestra, exploring the natural world, and jumping into leaf piles […]

By |April 27th, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments

2018 Taxonomy Pun Contest Winners!

Happy Taxonomist Appreciation Day! Announcing Our First 5th Annual Pun Contest Winner!

Happy week of Taxonomist Appreciation Day! Years ago, California State University Dominguez Hills’s Associate Professor of Biology Terry McGlynn minted the day to call attention to the extraordinary and often-overlooked services taxonomists provide to all of us. Buzz Hoot Roar honors our systematists and taxonomists with a pun competition. For our fifth year, we had dozens of top-rate punsters and some of our all-time favorite puns. With the help of our judges, we selected five favorites, and will share one with you each day this week.

This year, we had three very special celebrity guest judges: Clinton ColmenaresNatalie Sopinka, and Neil McCoy (Learn more about them below.)

 

Drumroll, please… Announcing Friday’s winner! Pun and illustration by Cory Bryant (@Brantromyzon), a postdoctoral Great Lakes researcher who loves to communicate science through art and stories.

Thursday’s winner, Raymond Nakamura (@raymondsbrain), has got us covered:

Wednesday’s winner, Christina Madlinger (@C_Madlinger), empowers manta rays everywhere:

What did the stingray say when her husband was unfaithful?

Tuesday’s winner Mustelid tell you something! Way to go, Quinn Burrell (@Quinnidae)!

Here is Monday’s winner. Congratulations, Stephanie Januchowski-Hartley (@connectedwaters)!

Learn more about our awesome celebrity guest judges!

Natalie Sopinka is a communicator of science at Canadian Science Publishing. She is a fish biologist by training, lover […]

By |March 19th, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments

And our second winner…

Protists might be hard to classify, but they can get organized when they need to!

Pun and illustration by Jennifer Joslin (@SpecimenJenn), a freelance designer and natural science illustrator living in the forested outskirts of Portland, Oregon. She recently completed a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology with a focus on Biological Conservation, a subject which continually influences her creative work. Jenn can usually be found drawing, reading, exploring the Pacific Northwest, or helping people care for wildlife in some way or another.

By |March 21st, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Announcing Buzz Hoot Roar’s new Artist in Residence!

We at Buzz Hoot Roar are pleased and proud to announce our newest Artist in Residence! Over the next year, Christin Hardy will use her unique graphic style to explore six science posts. Read on to learn more about Christin, and stay tuned to enjoy her excellent work.

Christin2

Who: I’m Christin Hardy, a graphic designer and illustrator living in the city of oaks, Raleigh N.C., and hailing from Seven Springs, a teeny tiny town in rural Eastern North Carolina where the livestock outnumber people.

Christin1

I graduated from NC State University with my bachelor’s in graphic design, and after a few odd jobs landed my current job as a graphic designer for the NC Department of Transportation. There, I get to work on projects from all sorts of divisions ranging from aviation and rail to highways and bike/pedestrian. One of my favorite projects was the poster I made for National Train Day in 2014:

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Why: I’ve always loved science and tend to choose extracurricular activities that reflect that, such as volunteering for the Duke Lemur Center (so much fun), working for the entomology lab at NCSU where I counted bee sperm for a summer (not as fun, but cool) and interning at the Smithsonian in Washington D.C. (definitely ties with the lemurs).

Christin3

So, when I got the email asking if I wanted to be the next artist in residence, I immediately gasped and said “YES!! Of course!!!” While I enjoy my work for the government, Buzz Hoot Roar gives me an outlet where I can […]

By |November 3rd, 2015|Uncategorized|3 Comments