Clownfish live in groups of two to six, but only the two largest in the group can breed.


Instead of fighting or kicking out their group members for dominance like wasps, chimps, and many other animals, clownfish patiently wait their turn to the top and call to each other to determine size, as well as to help find each other.

When they’re not sex switching or bubbling out babbles, they’re happily fertilizing their anemone homes with poop.

By Roar. Illustrated by Christin Hardy.

Christin Hardy grew up in a teeny, tiny place called Seven Springs, North Carolina, where livestock outnumber people. Her father is a farmer and her mother is an artist, so naturally Christin turned out to be an artist who loves nature, infusing it into her work and life. Currently she works for the NCDOT designing posters, banners and brochures, but her heart lies in explaining science through illustrations and graphic design. You can find her on Instagram @c_creature, on Twitter @c_hristin or send her an email at


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