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The heat is killing me. No, really.

Without a doubt, these heat waves and air pollution are killing us.

The World Health Organization estimates that our crazy climate change weather trends over the past 30 years kill more than 150,000 people each year.

A climate change-related heat wave in 2003 killed nearly 70,000 people in Europe alone. That’s bad news, as historically hot summers are becoming an annual norm for most of us.

Even the poor cows make less milk.

The mercury seesaw also may be pushing us over the mental edge, as hotter days wreak havoc on our identities and livelihoods.

Ocean oscillations like El Niño can lead to cooler years and mask global warming, but don’t be fooled: The warming trend and increasing extreme weather persists.

When people dump greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide, methane, and water vapor in the atmosphere, they trap heat and the planet feels the burn. More ocean water evaporates, and monster storms pour down. At the same time, evaporation, early snow melt, and more lead to drought. Crops drown or burn. Even lizards bake toward extinction.

Get a popsicle. Maybe take a walk. But try […]

By |October 11th, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Recluse or Not? Citizen science with SPIDERS!

Though many of us believe brown recluse spiders lurk in every crevice and unoccupied shoe, ready to chomp down at a moment’s notice, most evidence suggests it doesn’t happen that often. But who could blame us for feeling concerned? We may even be genetically predisposed to fear spiders. Our fear doesn’t bode well for spiders, who–regardless of whether they’re helpful or harmful–often find themselves at the wrong end of our shoe.

Fortunately, there’s a new citizen science project, Recluse or Not, that aims to help reveal what’s actually lurking in our crevices while at the same time clear the brown recluse’s bad rap.

If you think you see a brown recluse spider, snap a pic and tweet it to @RecluseOrNot. There, one of three entomological experts: Matt Bertone (@bertonemyia), Catherine Scott (@Cataranea), and Eleanor Spicer Rice (@VerdantEleanor) will take a look and let you know if you’ve got a brown recluse. If you do, let them know your location and they’ll record it to improve scientists’ understanding of where brown recluses are hanging out these days. There will be quizzes with prizes! There will be useful and interesting spider information! Something for everyone!

To celebrate, enjoy this handy how-to on safely catching and releasing spiders by Jamie Van Wart.

Please visit Catherine Scott’s awesome blog to learn more about the project.

By Roar.

Art by Jaime Van Wart who is a graphic designer and illustrator based in Los Angeles. Previously a User Experience Designer at IBM, Jaime recently graduated from CalArts with an MFA in Graphic Design and is currently working as an Art Director at Blind. See her work here and follow her on Twitter @meatballshorti.

By |October 1st, 2017|Uncategorized|1 Comment

The final 2017 winner!

And our last winning submission for this year’s Taxonomy Day Pun Contest! The pun’s by @phishdoc!

 

Special thanks again to our expert judges for picking the punniest puns this year! Their job was a tough one. The competition was steep!

Our judges:

James Hutson (@jameshutson) is a visual science communications specialist who explains all manner of things with award-winning, animated and narrated explainer videos, illustrations and infographics (jameshutson.net).

Christine Nishiyama (@might_could) is an illustrator and writer working out of Atlanta. She lends her approachable, charming style to picture books, graphic novels, and comics. She also writes essays and teaches courses to help other creatives tell their own stories, and encourage everyone to make more art (mightcouldstudios.com).

Hoot, graphic designer (@sarahblackmonlips)

By |March 24th, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Pun contest, day 4…another winner!

Today’s winning submission by @oberrated explains why we’ve been hearing “Free Bird” trickling through salmon-packed babbling brooks and streams. #SciArt by Hoot (@sarahblackmonlips)!

Save

By |March 23rd, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Our third winner!

Today’s pun was submitted by @manila_folder, who by all reports is a fun-gi.

By |March 22nd, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments

And our second winner…

Protists might be hard to classify, but they can get organized when they need to!

Pun and illustration by Jennifer Joslin (@SpecimenJenn), a freelance designer and natural science illustrator living in the forested outskirts of Portland, Oregon. She recently completed a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology with a focus on Biological Conservation, a subject which continually influences her creative work. Jenn can usually be found drawing, reading, exploring the Pacific Northwest, or helping people care for wildlife in some way or another.

By |March 21st, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Announcing the winners of the 2017 #TaxonomyPun contest!

Happy week of Taxonomist Appreciation Day! Years ago, California State University Dominguez Hills’s  Associate Professor of Biology Terry McGlynn minted the day to call attention to the extraordinary and often-overlooked services taxonomists provide to all of us. Buzz Hoot Roar honors our systematists and taxonomists with a pun competition. This year, we had dozens of top rate punsters and some of our all-time favorite puns. We were tickled pink to have the great artists James Hutson and Christine Nishiyama, as well as our own artsy Sarah Blackmon Lips judge the puns (learn more about them below).

Without further ado, here’s our first winner. Pun illustrated by Roar.

Way to go, @LinguoMalkavian!

Our judges:

James Hutson (@jameshutson) is a visual science communications specialist who explains all manner of things with award-winning, animated and narrated explainer videos, illustrations and infographics (jameshutson.net).

Christine Nishiyama (@might_could) is an illustrator and writer working out of Atlanta. She lends her approachable, charming style to picture books, graphic novels, and comics. She also writes essays and teaches courses to help other creatives tell their own stories, and encourage everyone to make more art (mightcouldstudios.com).

Hoot, graphic designer (@sarahblackmonlips)

Stay tuned for another winner each day this week!

By |March 20th, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Attention! Attention! Pun Contest!

In honor of our great appreciation for those who love to order, classify, categorize, group, arrange, grade and rank (and just in time for Taxonomist Appreciation Day), Buzz Hoot Roar is proud to announce its fourth annual pun contest.

Check out one of last year’s winners:

Pun by Emily Dangremond, @Docta_Danger. Illustration by Buzz, @verdantrobin.

Here’s how it works:

1. Tweet us your best taxonomy-related pun by Friday, March 10.

2. Our celebrity judges will select five favorites.

3. Winners will receive: their puns illustrated on Buzz Hoot Roar’s blog, a set of printed greeting cards to share with the taxonomists in their lives, and a BHR super-soft T-shirt.

Let the witticisms begin!

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By |March 1st, 2017|Uncategorized|1 Comment

Overdressed for the Party: How Climate Change is Bad News for Snowshoe Hares

Snowshoe hares, on trend with arctic fashion, have snow-white winter coats they shed in favor of sleek, earthy brown duds in warmer months.

This luxurious look blends with their locale, keeping them safe from predators like stoats and foxes.

As the earth warms, we’re seeing fewer snowy days each year. The snow melts earlier and arrives later. Models predict that 50 years from now in Montana—one place snowshoe hares hop—there will be 20 fewer snow days each year than today. Snowshoe hares use day length, not temperature, to determine when to molt. Until recently, this trusty strategy was a more reliable indicator of seasonal flux. Now, however, snowshoe hares find themselves overdressed for the party.

But snowshoe hares don’t know they’re overdressed. They think they’re camouflaged and still practice their now not-so-sneaky “you can’t see me!” sit-and-hide strategy, making them easy pickings for hungry hare hunters. They have a 7 percent higher chance of being eaten, which might or might not sound like a lot, but, according to Scott Mills, NC State University professor of wildlife population ecology, “at this rate, given what we know, we can predict that hares will severely decline by the end of this century.”

Hares might be able to hop out of this pickle. They could learn to run and hide, or they could start changing their coats earlier and wearing their brown coats longer, thanks to natural selection.

Snowshoes aren’t the only creatures suffering a fashion faux pas. At least 14 arctic species change coats with the seasons.

Check our facts!

http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/281/1782/20140029.short

http://www.pnas.org/content/110/18/7360.short

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ele.12568/full

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Written by Roar. Illustrated by Leia K.
Leia K. […]

By |February 22nd, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments

How Climate Change Puts Fish on a Diet

If humans continue to emit greenhouse gases at their current rate, catch at ocean fisheries may decline 20-50 percent by the end of the decade. (That’s 2-5 percent per decade.) JoAnna Wendel, science journalist and illustrator in Washington, D.C., caught up with Phoebe Woodworth-Jefcoats from NOAA to explain why.

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In a warmer environment, fish metabolism rises, which means they need to eat more. But in these warmer waters, there’s less to eat.


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In the North Pacific, there’s a huge, natural vortex of wind and warm water swirling clockwise. Because of warm temperatures, nutrient-rich water from below doesn’t get mixed in with surface water, which means zooplankton can’t live there.


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If there are fewer zooplankton, that means less food.

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The material for this comic was inspired by a presentation by Phoebe Woodworth-Jefcoats at the American Geophysical Union’s Ocean Sciences Meeting in New Orleans, LA, earlier this year. Woodworth-Jefcoats is a research oceanographer at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center.  She studies the open ocean ecosystem in the central North Pacific.  Her work focuses on how this ecosystem is impacted by factors such as fishing and climate change.

Written and illustrated by JoAnna Wendel, a science journalist in Washington, D.C., covering Earth and space science for eos.org, the news magazine of the American Geophysical Union. She also likes to dabble in science comics covering all topics of science. You can follow her on Twitter at @JoAnnaScience and check out some of her Earth and space science […]

By |August 31st, 2016|Uncategorized|0 Comments